The TPMS sensor batteries have an expected life of 7-10 years. When a battery in any of the sensors has died the vehicle will illuminate the TPMS warning indicator on the gauge cluster. When the light is illuminated the system is no longer monitoring the vehicle's tire pressures. Have your vehicle inspected by your local dealer if the indicator is illuminated.

source

LOS ANGELES — Book by Cadillac, a subscription service that General Motors put on hiatus in late 2018, will return early next year with a new direction, said Deborah Wahl, GM's chief marketing officer.

Speaking Tuesday at the J.D. Power/NADA AutoConference L.A. here, Wahl said the first dealers will begin piloting the revamped program in February. While she did not go into details, she promised greater "convenience, flexibility and value for potential subscribers."

Wahl, who in September was named GM's first global CMO in seven years, said the program would be better integrated with Cadillac's dealer network, and said that Dublin Cadillac in California would be among the first to test the new program.

"We do still see a lot of interest from consumers in finding different ownership models, but the right price, value, how we do that, how we bundle those services is what we're working on," Wahl told Automotive News in an interview earlier this year. She did not discuss pricing on Tuesday.

The first Book by Cadillac program, launched in 2017, allowed customers to pay a $1,800 monthly fee that covered insurance and maintenance costs. Subscribers could swap in and out of Cadillac vehicles with no long-term commitment.

Wahl said the learnings from that program were significant. Roughly 70 percent of users, she said, were conquest customers new to Cadillac.

"There's really no one-size-fits-all solution for personal transportation," she said.

Wahl's presentation Tuesday focused on how she is attempting to help GM stay ahead of consumer preferences. She cited another Cadillac initiative, Super Cruise, as a technology customers may not have asked for, but loved.

The hands-free driver-assist system was launched in 2017 on the CT6. The luxury brand plans to expand it to the CT5 starting in 2020 before ultimately adopting the technology throughout its lineup.

Wahl said 85 percent of Super Cruise users are either interested in trying it again or say they have to have the feature on their next vehicle. To date, customers have driven 4.3 million miles with the feature enabled, she said.

It's one piece of GM's ambitious quest to reach zero crashes, zero emissions and zero congestion.

"Over time," Wahl said. "the status quo solves absolutely nothing."

Hannah Lutz contributed.

Source link

The campaign amounts to a significant effort for a vehicle that is being launched into an EV market that remains niche, despite much hype.

Year-to-date, 175,350 electric vehicles have been sold in the U.S, which is less than 2 percent of all vehicle sales, according to figures provided by Kelley Blue Book sourced from insideevs.com. Tesla dominates EVs, selling 491,602 since 2010, compared with just 9,787 by Ford.

But the Mach-E represents a mindshift for Ford, which had previously sold electrified versions of more economy-minded models, like Focus, rather than a brand like Mustang that is known for performance. “This is a huge play by Ford to get serious about EVs,” says Karl Brauer, executive publisher of Kelley Blue Book. It is as much of a corporate branding play as anything, he notes, driven by a desire to be perceived by consumers and analysts as “a forward-thinking, progessive company.”

Ford’s push follows moves by other high-performance brands to take on Tesla, including Audi, which has poured significant marketing behind its new “e-tron” SUV, the first of three battery electric vehicles the luxury brand will introduce over three years. Jaguar, meanwhile, has run TV ads for its electric I-PACE SUV, including one that uses the phrase “roar silently.”

But Brauer says Ford’s Mach-E fills a gap for U.S. buyers who prefer domestic brands and might be lured into buying an EV backed by an iconic brand such as Mustang that has been around a lot longer than Tesla.

Still, he says that does not guarantee the Mach-E will be “an overnight success.” There “is not going to be a single model that comes out in one fell swoop and turns the world into an EV-buying world,” he adds. “It’s going to be a long process of knocking down barriers and knocking down resistance from various demographics one-by-one.”

Ford is targeting a group of buyers it refers to internally as “lovers of the new,” which it refers to in internal documents as “LOTN.” 

“These are folks who are younger, more educated, more affluent,” VanDyke says. “Most of them...have never shopped Ford before. So we are absolutely interested in expanding the audience and bringing new people into the brand.”

Still, Ford wants to avoid turning off Mustang loyalists, some of whom might find anything resembling an SUV to be blasphemous for the pony car brand built on sports coupes. That is why Ford put an emphasis on reaching out to Mustang clubs, including flying members of the enthusiast groups to Detroit to get a behind the scenes look at the Mach-E. Some members of California-based Mustang clubs were scheduled to participate in Sunday’s reveal event.

Ford is also trying to leverage its network of 2,000 dealers who are “certified, trained EV dealers,” VanDyke says, referring to the vast dealer network as a “competitive advantage” over Tesla. The dealers, he says, “are completely motivated to activate their active their loyal owner base.”

Source link