NEW YORK -- Five of the world's largest tech companies, including electric vehicle maker Tesla Inc., have been accused of being complicit in the death of children in the Democratic Republic of Congo forced to mine cobalt, a metal used to make telephones and computers, in a landmark lawsuit.

The legal complaint on behalf of 14 families from Congo was filed on Sunday by International Rights Advocates, a U.S.-based human rights non-profit, against Tesla, Apple Inc., Google parent Alphabet Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Dell Technologies Inc..

The companies were part of a system of forced labor that the families claimed led to the death and serious injury of their children, it said.

It marked the first time the tech industry jointly has faced legal action over the source of its cobalt.

Images in the court documents, filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, showed children with disfigured or missing limbs.

Six of the 14 children in the case were killed in tunnel collapses, and the others suffered life-altering injuries, including paralysis, it said.

"These companies -- the richest companies in the world, these fancy gadget-making companies -- have allowed children to be maimed and killed to get their cheap cobalt," Terrence Collingsworth, an attorney representing the families, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Cobalt is essential in making rechargeable lithium batteries used in millions of products sold by the tech industry.

More than half of the world's cobalt is produced in Congo.

Global demand for the metal is expected to increase at 7 percent to 13 percent annually over the next decade, according to a 2018 study by the European Commission.

The lawsuit said the children, some as young as 6 years old, were forced by their families' extreme poverty to leave school and work in cobalt mining owned by the British mining company Glencore. Glencore has previously been accused of using child labor.

Some children were paid as little as $1.50 per day, working 6 days a week, it said.

In response to a request for comment, Dell said in an email that it has "never knowingly sourced operations" using child labor and has launched an investigation into the allegations.

A spokesperson for Glencore said: "Glencore notes the allegations contained in a U.S. lawsuit filed on 15th December 2019.

"Glencore’s production of cobalt in the DRC is a by-product of our industrial copper production. Glencore’s operations in the DRC do not purchase or process any artisanally mined ore.

"Glencore does not tolerate any form of child, forced, or compulsory labor."

Tesla, Apple, Google, Microsoft did not immediately respond for comment.

The legal complaint argued that the companies all have the ability to overhaul their cobalt supply chains to ensure safer conditions.

"I've never encountered or documented a more severe asymmetry in the allocation of income between the top of the supply chain and the bottom," said Siddharth Kara, a researcher on modern slavery who is an expert witness in the case.

"It's that disconnect that makes this perhaps the worst injustice of slavery and child exploitation that I've seen in my two decades research," Kara said.

More than 40 million people have been estimated to be captive in modern slavery, which includes forced labor and forced marriage, according to Walk Free and the International Labour Organization.

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DETROIT — General Motors plans to build four electric vehicles at Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly by the end of 2023, including battery-powered versions of the GMC Sierra and Cadillac Escalade, according to a prominent forecasting firm.

The plant, which had been scheduled to close in January, will remain open under the automaker's newly ratified contract with the UAW. The deal states that GM has agreed to invest $3 billion and use the plant to build electric pickups and vans.

Production of those vehicles is scheduled to start in 2021 and will be followed by the electric Sierra and Escalade in 2023, LMC Automotive told Automotive News. LMC is a closely watched provider of industry sales and production forecasts.

GM declined to comment Thursday on its future product plans.

Given the platform and size, LMC expects the van built at Detroit-Hamtramck to be full-size, possibly similar to the Ford Transit.

The plant's full capacity today is 160,000 vehicles per year, but after the conversion to EV production, capacity will drop to about 100,000 vehicles, LMC estimates.

GM expects to employ 2,225 people at Detroit-Hamtramck when it reaches full capacity, according to its contract with the UAW. The plant will play an integral role in GM's commitment to build 20 EVs globally by 2023.

Last fall, GM said Detroit-Hamtramck was one of four U.S. plants slated to close as part of a sweeping restructuring plan. The other three plants identified — Lordstown Assembly in Ohio and transmission plants in Maryland and Michigan — have been shut down permanently. GM last week agreed to sell the Lordstown plant to an EV-manufacturing startup.

Reuters last month reported that GM may bring back the Hummer brand on a vehicle it builds at Detroit-Hamtramck, though it's unclear which product would bear the Hummer name.

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We've partnered with Ludacris, one of the most successful hip-hop artists and actors in the United States, to restore his beloved ‘93 Acura Legend to its former glory.

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