1981: Michigan Supreme Court allows Detroit to demolish up to 1,500 homes, more than 140 businesses, a hospital and 6 churches in Poletown neighborhood for construction of Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly. Former Dodge Main plant is demolished on Hamtramck side of site.

1985: Production begins. Vehicles built in plant's first 25 years include the Cadillac Seville, Eldorado and DeVille; Buick Riviera, LeSabre and Lucerne; and Oldsmobile Toronado.

2010: Chevy Volt production begins

2013: Chevy Impala production begins

2015: Cadillac CT6 production begins

2016: Buick LaCrosse production begins

March 2017: GM eliminates second shift

November 2018: GM "unallocates" D-Ham, Lordstown Assembly, Oshawa Assembly and transmission plants in Michigan and Maryland

February 2019: GM postpones end of production from June 2019 to January 2020

March 2019: Volt, LaCrosse production end

October 2019: UAW ratifies contract that keeps D-Ham open with $3 billion investment

January 2020: CT6 production to end

February 2020: Impala production to end

2021: Electric pickup, van production to begin

2023: Electric GMC Sierra, Cadillac Escalade production to begin

Source: GM, LMC Automotive, Automotive News research

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LOS ANGELES — Nissan's hopes of shedding its bargain-brand reputation and regaining market share hinge on a raft of product reboots, Nissan executives said on the sidelines of the Los Angeles Auto Show.

The product revival started with the unveiling of the redesigned 2020 Sentra, and it will encompass 10 new and freshened vehicles by the end of 2020, including an electric crossover.

"New products are going to be critical" to turn the business around, David Kershaw, Nissan division vice president of sales and regional operations, told Automotive News.

By developing more "aspirational products," Nissan hopes to attract more creditworthy customers and reduce the need for discounting, which has harmed the brand's image and wreaked havoc on dealer margins.

Nissan division's U.S. sales through October tumbled 6 percent, and the automaker's 7.5 percent share of the U.S. market through three quarters trailed rivals Toyota (12.3 percent) and Honda (8.6 percent), according to the Automotive News Data Center. Meanwhile, about 30 percent of Nissan's U.S. dealerships are losing money, with an additional 10 percent merely breaking even, a person familiar with the data said this summer.

The latest model reboot was revealed last week. The Sentra compact sedan amps up in power and design, hoping to capture more of the evaporating market for sedans. Riding on a new platform, the eighth-generation Sentra is powered by a 2.0-liter, four-cylinder engine that delivers 149 hp, up 19 percent from the current generation's 1.8-liter engine.

The revamp across the portfolio, including redesigns of crossovers and pickups, aims to improve the brand's appeal to consumers.

"Going from somewhat of the oldest lineup in the industry, at least of the Asian brands, this will be an opportunity for us to have some fresh things that are out there," Kershaw said. "We are going to really talk about the attributes of our product and what's important to the customer — technology and safety obviously being key drivers of that."

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